jOOPL keywords

Introduction

jOOPL has some reserved keywords. As this library cannot define new JavaScript keywords, these are represented by a dollar ($) symbol and an identifier like this:
  • $someKeyword

Since keywords are variables, there is a chance to change their meaning and this will break jOOPL in an unpredictable way. Be aware to don't reuse jOOPL reserved keywords!

Note:
jOOPL works with no problems in conjunction with jQuery and other libraries because the dollar ($) sign in jOOPL is a variable/identifier prefix. In jQuery and others, the dollar sign ($) is a variable itself.

Keywords

Name Description
$global Represents the global scope. Starting from 2.0 version of jOOPL, namespaces and classes are child of $global object. This is very important because this avoids adding strange behaviors to the parent and standard Window object.
$namespace Represents an object with methods related to namespace management and registration.
$interface Represents an object with methods related to interface declaration and utilities.
$class Represents an object with methods related to class declaration and utilities.
$def Starting from 2.0 version of jOOPL, $def is the preferred operator/constructor to declare classes (see Classes).
$interfacedef Starting from 2.0 of jOOPL, $interface-def is the preferred operator/constructor to declare interfaces (see Interfaces)
this.$base In the scope of a class constructor, method or property (accessors), represents the access to the instance of the base class, if the current class derives a parent. (see Inheritance)
this.$ctor In the scope of a class constructor, represents the access to the constructor method. Usually this is accessed through this.$base.$ctor() in order to call the base class constructor, if the current class derives a parent class
$new Represents the operator used to instantiate classes. It is a shortcut to $class.create(...).
this.$_ Every class has a special variable or field $_ which represents the class fields' container. In jOOPL, class' fields are not declared directly in this but in this.$_.
this.$_.$derived this.$_.$derived is a system special field present in any class that provides access to the more derived members of the whole class. This is important for polymorphism, since abstract/virtual (must inherit) members must be accessed through this.$_.$derived. (see Polymorphism)

Last edited Feb 28, 2013 at 3:32 PM by MFidemraizer, version 18

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